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Tag Archives: Forgiveness

Let My People Go

Let my people go

Pharaoh would not listen to Moses and Aaron because he did not know or respect God. People who do not know God may not listen to his word or his messengers. Like Moses and Aaron, we need to persist. When others reject you or your faith doesn’t be surprised or discouraged. Continue to tell them about God, trusting him to open minds and soften stubborn hearts.

Moses and Aaron took their message to Pharaoh just as God directed. The unhappy result was harder work and more and more oppression for the Hebrews. Sometimes hardship comes as a result of obeying God. Are you following God but still suffering- or suffering even worse than before? If your life is miserable then don’t assume you have fallen out of God’s favor. You may be suffering for doing good in an evil world.

The verses that have touched our hearts while reading the chapter are as follows:

2 But Pharaoh said, “Who is the LORD, that I should heed him and let Israel go? I do not know the LORD, and I will not let Israel go.”
21 They said to them, “The LORD look upon you and judge! You have brought us into bad odor with Pharaoh and his officials, and have put a sword in their hand to kill us.”
22 Then Moses turned again to the LORD and said, “O LORD, why have you mistreated this people? Why did you ever send me?

Let’s Pray: Ever since we have started to read the word of God. Our lives have been affected, affected for good. We never understood God as we started to understand him now. Our prayer lives are becoming enriching and we have started to grow more and more in our Lord. Heavenly father, we are grateful to you for making us know you. We pray to be your children and be near you. Yes, we also feel to do a lot of things and complain as well. Our bodies fall prey to the sinful activities and we seek pardon for it. We truly repent for our sins and that Christ was our ransom to get away from the sinful nature. We reverently pray to be guided and loved by you. In precious name of our redeemer, Jesus Christ we pray. Amen

Chapter 5: Let My People Go

The first audience with Pharaoh fails
1 Afterward Moses and Aaron went to Pharaoh and said, “Thus says the LORD, the God of Israel, ‘Let my people go, so that they may celebrate a festival to me in the wilderness.'”
2 But Pharaoh said, “Who is the LORD, that I should heed him and let Israel go? I do not know the LORD, and I will not let Israel go.”
3 Then they said, “The God of the Hebrews has revealed himself to us; let us go a three days’ journey into the wilderness to sacrifice to the LORD our God, or he will fall upon us with pestilence or sword.”
4 But the king of Egypt said to them, “Moses and Aaron, why are you taking the people away from their work? Get to your labors!”
5 Pharaoh continued, “Now they are more numerous than the people of the land and yet you want them to stop working!”
6 That same day Pharaoh commanded the taskmasters of the people, as well as their supervisors,
7 “You shall no longer give the people straw to make bricks, as before; let them go and gather straw for themselves.
8 But you shall require of them the same quantity of bricks as they have made previously; do not diminish it, for they are lazy; that is why they cry, ‘Let us go and offer sacrifice to our God.’
9 Let heavier work be laid on them; then they will labor at it and pay no attention to deceptive words.”
10 So the taskmasters and the supervisors of the people went out and said to the people, “Thus says Pharaoh, ‘I will not give you straw.
11 Go and get straw yourselves, wherever you can find it; but your work will not be lessened in the least.'”
12 So the people scattered throughout the land of Egypt, to gather stubble for straw.
13 The taskmasters were urgent, saying, “Complete your work, the same daily assignment as when you were given straw.”
14 And the supervisors of the Israelites, whom Pharaoh’s taskmasters had set over them, were beaten, and were asked, “Why did you not finish the required quantity of bricks yesterday and today, as you did before?”
15 Then the Israelite supervisors came to Pharaoh and cried, “Why do you treat your servants like this? 16 No straw is given to your servants, yet they say to us, ‘Make bricks!’ Look how your servants are beaten!
You are unjust to your own people.”
17 He said, “You are lazy, lazy; that is why you say, ‘Let us go and sacrifice to the LORD.’
18 Go now, and work; for no straw shall be given you, but you shall still deliver the same number of bricks.”
19 The Israelite supervisors saw that they were in trouble when they were told, “You shall not lessen your daily number of bricks.”
20 As they left Pharaoh, they came upon Moses and Aaron who were waiting to meet them.
21 They said to them, “The LORD look upon you and judge! You have brought us into bad odor with Pharaoh and his officials, and have put a sword in their hand to kill us.”
22 Then Moses turned again to the LORD and said, “O LORD, why have you mistreated this people? Why did you ever send me?
23 Since I first came to Pharaoh to speak in your name, he has mistreated this people, and you have done nothing at all to deliver your people.”

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Posted by on October 18, 2015 in My Christianship

 

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Burial of Jacob

jacob_burial_nuremberg_bible

When Jacob died at the age of 147, Joseph wept and mourned for months. When someone close to us dies, we need a long period of time to work through our grief. Crying and sharing our feelings with others helps us recover and go on with our life. Allow yourself and others the freedom to grieve over the loss of a loved one and give yourself time enough to complete your grieving process.

Now that Jacob (Israel) was dead, the brothers feared revenge from Joseph. Could he really have forgiven them for selling him into slavery? But to their surprise, Joseph not only forgave them but reassured them, offering to care for them and their families. Joseph’s forgiveness was complete. He demonstrated how God graciously accepts us even when we have ignored or rejected him, we should graciously forgive others.

The verses that have touched our hearts while reading the chapter are as follows:
9 Both chariots and charioteers went up with him. It was a very great company.
11 When the Canaanite inhabitants of the land saw the mourning on the threshing floor of Atad, they said, “This is a grievous mourning on the part of the Egyptians.” Therefore the place was named Abel mizraim; it is beyond the Jordan.
12 Thus his sons did for him as he had instructed them.
19 But Joseph said to them, “Do not be afraid! Am I in the place of God?
20 Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today.

Let’s Pray: Do you trust God enough to wait patiently for him to bring good out of bad situations/. Yes, we can trust him because, as Joseph learned, God can overrule people’s evil intentions to bring about his intended results. Lord, have mercy on us all; guide us towards a sinless living and ever trusting life. Amen

Chapter 50: Burial of Jacob

1 Then Joseph threw himself on his father’s face and wept over him and kissed him.
2 Joseph commanded the physicians in his service to embalm his father. So the physicians embalmed Israel;
3 they spent forty days in doing this, for that is the time required for embalming. And the Egyptians wept for him seventy days.
4 When the days of weeping for him were past, Joseph addressed the household of Pharaoh, “If now I have found favor with you, please speak to Pharaoh as follows:
5 My father made me swear an oath; he said, ‘I am about to die. In the tomb that I hewed out for myself in the land of Canaan, there you shall bury me.’ Now therefore let me go up, so that I may bury my father; then I will return.”
6 Pharaoh answered, “Go up, and bury your father, as he made you swear to do.”
7 So Joseph went up to bury his father. With him went up all the servants of Pharaoh, the elders of his household, and all the elders of the land of Egypt,
8 as well as all the household of Joseph, his brothers, and his father’s household. Only their children, their flocks, and their herds were left in the land of Goshen.
9 Both chariots and charioteers went up with him. It was a very great company.
10 When they came to the threshing floor of Atad, which is beyond the Jordan, they held there a very great and sorrowful lamentation; and he observed a time of mourning for his father seven days.
11 When the Canaanite inhabitants of the land saw the mourning on the threshing floor of Atad, they said, “This is a grievous mourning on the part of the Egyptians.” Therefore the place was named Abel mizraim; it is beyond the Jordan.
12 Thus his sons did for him as he had instructed them.
13 They carried him to the land of Canaan and buried him in the cave of the field at Machpelah, the field near Mamre, which Abraham bought as a burial site from Ephron the Hittite.
14 After he had buried his father, Joseph returned to Egypt with his brothers and all who had gone up with him to bury his father.
15 Realizing that their father was dead, Joseph’s brothers said, “What if Joseph still bears a grudge against us and pays us back in full for all the wrong that we did to him?”
16 So they approached Joseph, saying, “Your father gave this instruction before he died,
17 ‘Say to Joseph: I beg you, forgive the crime of your brothers and the wrong they did in harming you.’ Now therefore please forgive the crime of the servants of the God of your father.” Joseph wept when they spoke to him.
18 Then his brothers also wept, fell down before him, and said, “We are here as your slaves.”
19 But Joseph said to them, “Do not be afraid! Am I in the place of God?
20 Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today.
21 So have no fear; I myself will provide for you and your little ones.” In this way he reassured them, speaking kindly to them.
22 So Joseph remained in Egypt, he and his father’s household; and Joseph lived one hundred ten years. 23 Joseph saw Ephraim’s children of the third generation; the children of Machir son of Manasseh were also born on Joseph’s knees.
24 Then Joseph said to his brothers, “I am about to die; but God will surely come to you, and bring you up out of this land to the land that he swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.”
25 So Joseph made the Israelites swear, saying, “When God comes to you, you shall carry up my bones from here.”
26 And Joseph died, being one hundred ten years old; he was embalmed and placed in a coffin in Egypt.

 
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Posted by on August 16, 2015 in My Christianship

 

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What is Lent?

Lent

The season of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and is derived by counting back 40 days (not including Sundays) from Easter day. Ash Wednesday is so called because of the imposition of Ashes on the foreheads of faithful, which serve as a reminder of the call to repentance and to believe in the good news. The period of Lent is a reminder of the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before taking up the mission he received from his father.

Immediately after the sixth antitheses (5:21-48) in the Sermon on the Mount, there follows instructions on three practices that were common among the Pharisees as a sign of closeness to God namely, alms-giving, prayer and fasting. All three though only a means to reach god can be made ends in themselves. Alms-giving can be ostentatious, prayer can be used to show-off and fasting can be used to point to one’s self. Jesus cautions the listeners about these dangers and challenges them to make them all internal activities that will lead the way to God rather than being made ends in themselves. The focus thus is on motivation with which one does what one does. If the motivation for doing good is to win the admiration of the human beings, then that action is selfish and self motivated and so does no good at all. If the action is done out of a sense of duty or obligation, it cannot be called pure and is instead diluted. However, if one does the action and accepts that the reward is in the performing of the action itself, such an action can be salvific. This is the challenge not only of Ash Wednesday, but of the whole season of Lent, “to give and not to count the cost, to labor and to look for no reward.”

For us Christians, Jesus has simplified matters. There is absolutely no obligation to love. When there is love then all our nations come from our hearts and spontaneously without counting the cost. Alms-giving becomes generous and spontaneous, prayer becomes union with God and leads to action and fasting is done in order to show our dependence on God and not on earthly things. How often have made “means” ends in themselves?

Taken from the Daily Reading, God’s Word 2013.

 
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Posted by on February 18, 2015 in My Christianship

 

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